Newsletters
Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)
Ron Zalben will be speaking on a variety of tax topics, on Monday nights on Goldstein on Gelt. The show airs both on Rusty Mike Radio and on Israel National Radio. You can listen here to Ron's segments.

Hear Don being interviewed re: U.S. Social Security.

Updated Israeli tax rules for New Immigrants and returning residents

See what a comprehensive salary package in Israel looks like.

The IRS now has an automated system for determining the status of your refund.

The official annual average exchange rates for converting US dollars into shekels (and vice versa) from the year 1991 to the present.

The IRS has released the annual inflation adjustments for 2023 for the income tax rate tables, plus more than 60 other tax provisions. The IRS makes these cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) each year to reflect inflation.


The 2023 cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) that affect pension plan dollar limitations and other retirement-related provisions have been released by the IRS. In general, many of the pension plan limitations will change for 2022 because the increase in the cost-of-living index due to inflation met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. 


For 2023, the Social Security wage cap will be $160,200, and social security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits will increase by 8.7 percent. These changes reflect cost-of-living adjustments to account for inflation.


The IRS has released the 2022-2023 special per diem rates. Taxpayers use the per diem rates to substantiate certain expenses incurred while traveling away from home. 


The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) has issued a final rule implementing the beneficial ownership information reporting provisions under the Corporate Transparency Act (CTA), which was enacted as part of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 ( P.L. 116-283). The CTA amended the Bank Secrecy Act by adding a new provision on beneficial ownership reporting ( 31 USC §5336).


The IRS issued final regulations to strengthen implementation of the Affordable Care Act by fixing the “family glitch.” The rules amend eligibility for the premium tax credit (PTC) to allow family members of workers who are offered unaffordable family coverage to qualify for premium tax credits. The regulations also add a minimum value rule for family members of employees, based on the benefits provided to the family members. This guidance would affect taxpayers who enroll, or enroll a family member, in individual health insurance coverage through a Health Insurance Exchange (Exchange) and who may be allowed a Premium Tax Credit for the coverage.


A new revenue procedure provides taxpayer assistance procedures to allow S corporations and their shareholders to resolve frequently encountered issues without requesting a private letter ruling (PLR).


The IRS identified drought-stricken areas where tax relief is available to taxpayers that sold or exchanged livestock because of drought. The relief extends the deadlines for taxpayers to replace the livestock and avoid reporting gain on the sales. These extensions apply until the drought-stricken area has a drought-free year.


Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden has indicated to the Internal Revenue Service what his expectations for the recently allocated funds from the Inflation Reduction Act are to be used for.


The American Institute of CPAs has posted comments on guidance recently issued by the Internal Revenue Service regarding the deductibility of payments by partnerships and S corporations for certain state and local taxes.


The general rule on business expenses is that you must prove everything in detail to be entitled to a deduction. Logs, preferably made contemporaneously to the business transaction, must show date, amount, and business purpose and you must produce receipts. Fortunately, the tax law has a practical side. Congress, the IRS and the courts each have applied their own brand of practicality in allowing certain exceptions to be made to the business substantiation rule.

Parents typically encourage their children to save for college, for a house, or simply for a rainy day. A child's retirement, however, is a less common early savings goal. Too many other expenses are at the forefront. Yet, helping to plan for a youngster's retirement is a move that astute families are making. Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) for income-earning minors and young adults offer a head-start on life-long financial planning.